Adolescent Immunization Recommendations

If you are 11-18 year of age, you may need one or more of the following immunizations. Talk to your health care provider about what immunizations you may need.

Adolecent Schedule (English)

Adolecent Schedule (Spanish)

Centers for Disease Control & Prevention Immunization Schedules

Measles
Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis booster (Tdap) or Td Hepatitis B
Hepatitis A
Hepatitis B
Human Papillomavirus
Varicella (Chickenpox)
Influenza
Pneumococcal Disease
Meningococcal Disease

Measles
Measles is especially contagious and can spread quickly in places like schools. Although most children receive the first dose of measles before entering school, it is Utah law that all children kindergarten through grade 12 have two doses of measles. It is most commonly given as the MMR vaccine, which protects against measles, mumps, and rubella.

Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis booster (Tdap) or Td
A booster dose of tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (Tdap) is recommended for adolescents at 11-12 years of age.

Hepatitis A
Many teens also need protection from hepatitis A disease. It is recommended that teens and young adults, especially high risk individuals, are vaccinated against hepatitis A.

Hepatitis B
In the United States, most cases of hepatitis B occur in teens and young adults. Hepatitis B can cause serious liver damage and death. This disease can be prevented with two or three doses (depending on brand) of vaccine, given over four to six months.

Human Papillomavirus (HPV)
HPV vaccine is an inactivated vaccine which protects against four major types of HPV and is recommended for girls at 11-12 years of age and males 9-26 years of age.

Varicella (Chickenpox)
Chickenpox is more dangerous when contracted as a teen or an adult and can cause serious complications. Adolescents 13 years of age and older (who have never had chickenpox or received chickenpox vaccine) should get two doses three months apart.

The following two immunizations may be recommended for those teens who have chronic health conditions. Check with your health care provider.

Influenza
Do you have a chronic health problem, such as asthma or diabetes mellitus? If you do, you may need a yearly influenza (flu) vaccine. Flu vaccine is recommended every fall for people with chronic diseases, and for those who want to avoid getting the flu.

Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Disease
Pneumococcal Conjugate Disease
If you have a chronic health condition, check with your health care provider to see if you should receive a pneumococcal vaccine.

Meningococcal Disease
Meningococcal disease causes such illnesses as meningitis, blood infection and pneumonia. The meningococcal conjugated vaccine is recommended for adolescents before high school entry (~15 years old) and for college freshmen.


Back to top