Page 1 | 2Influenza Vaccine

Visit the Utah Vaccination Locator to find a flu vaccine clinic near you.

Types of Influenza Vaccine

There are three types of influenza vaccines: an injectible shot; an intradermal (under the skin) vaccine and a nasal spray vaccine. Each season three strains of virus are included in the influenza vaccine. Most of the influenza vaccine offered for the 2013-2014 season will be trivalent (three component). Some seasonal influenza vaccines formulated to protect against four influenza viruses (quadrivalent influenza vaccines) will also be available.

Inactivated Influenza Vaccine or IIV - The inactivated influenza shot contains killed virus. Influenza shots are approved for use in people 6 months and older, including healthy people and people with chronic medical conditions. There are different types of the influenza shots available, including a high-dose vaccine for people 65 years of age and older. The high-dose vaccine is not recommended for people who have had a severe reaction to the influenza vaccine in the past.

The intradermal influenza vaccine is approved for people 18-64 years of age. The intradermal vaccine is injected into the skin instead of the muscle.

Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine or LAIV - The nasal spray vaccine or LAIV contains the same three virus strains but are weakened live viruses. LAIV is approved for use in healthy people 2-49 years of age who are not pregnant. All nasal spray vaccines for the 2013-2014 influenza season are expected to be quadrivalent, however, this makes up only a small portion of total vaccine availability.

Influenza Vaccine Virus Strains

World Health Organization (WHO) recommended that the Northern Hemisphere's 2013-2014 seasonal influenza vaccine contain the following three vaccine viruses:

  • an A/California/7/2009 (H1N1)pdm09-like virus;
  • an A(H3N2) virus antigenically like the cell-propagated prototype virus A/Victoria/361/2011;
  • a B/Massachusetts/2/2012-like virus.


It is recommended that quadrivalent vaccines containing two influenza B viruses contain the above three viruses and a B/Brisbane/60/2008-like virus.

Influenza Vaccine Recommendations*

For a summary of 2013-2014 influenza vaccine recommendations, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Inactivated Influenza Vaccine (IIV) - injectable

Age Group Number of Doses
6 months - 8 years*
2
greater than 9 years
1

 

High-Dose Influenza Vaccine

Age Group Number of Doses
65 years and older
1

 

Intradermal Influenza Vaccine

Age Group Number of Doses
18-64 years
1

 

Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine (LAIV) - nasal spray

Age Group Number of Doses
2-8 years with no previous influenza vaccine
2 separated by 4 weeks
2-8 years with 1 dose seasonal
influenza vaccine (See Notes 1, 2)

1
9-49 years
1


*Note: Influenza Vaccine in Children 6 months through 8 Years of Age

Children aged 6 months through 8 years who are receiving influenza vaccine for the first time, and some in this age group who have previously been vaccinated, require two doses of vaccine administered ≥4 weeks apart. Two approaches for determining the number of doses are recommended, both of which are acceptable:

1. Children 6 months through 8 years of age need only 1 dose of vaccine in 2013-14 if they received a total of 2 or more doses of seasonal vaccine since July 1, 2010. Children who did not receive a total of 2 or more doses of seasonal influenza vaccine since July 1, 2010 require 2 doses in 2013-14.

2. If a child 6 months through 8 years of age is known to have received at least 2 doses of seasonal influenza vaccine during any prior season, and at least 1 dose of a 2009(H1N1)-containing vaccine--i.e., 2010-11, 2011-12, or 2012-13 seasonal vaccine or the monovalent 2009(H1N1) vaccine--then the child needs only 1 dose for 2013-14. Using this approach, children 6 months through 8 years of age need only 1 dose of vaccine in 2013-14 if they have received any of the following:

    • 2 or more doses of seasonal influenza vaccine since July 1, 2010 or;
    • 2 or more doses of seasonal influenza vaccine before July 1, 1010 and 1 or more doses of monovalent 2009(H1N1) vaccine or;
    • 1 or more doses of seasonal influenza vaccine before July 1, 2010 and 1 or more doses of seasonal influenza vaccine since July 1, 2010


Children 6 months through 8 years of age for whom one of these conditions is not met require 2 doses in 2013-14.

Continued on Page 2.