Page 1 | 2 Influenza Vaccine

Visit the Utah Vaccination Locator to find a flu vaccine clinic near you.

Who Should Be Vaccinated

Influenza Vaccination Recommendations for the 2014-2015 Influenza Season:

Children:

All children aged 6 months--18 years should be vaccinated annually.
Children and adolescents at higher risk for influenza complications, including those who:

  • are aged 6 months--4 years (59 months)
  • have chronic pulmonary (including asthma), cardiovascular (except hypertension), renal, hepatic, cognitive, neurologic/neuromuscular, hematological or metabolic disorders (including diabetes mellitus)
  • are immunosuppressed (including immunosuppression caused by medications or by human immunodeficiency virus)
  • are receiving long-term aspirin therapy and therefore might be at risk for experiencing Reye syndrome after influenza virus infection
  • are residents of long-term care facilities; and
  • will be pregnant during the influenza season.

Note: Children less than 6 months of age cannot receive influenza vaccination. Household and other close contacts (e.g., daycare providers) of children less than 6 months of age, including older children and adolescents, should be vaccinated.

Adults:

Annual vaccination against influenza is recommended for any adult who wants to reduce the risk of becoming ill with influenza or of transmitting it to others. Vaccination is recommended for all adults in the following groups:

  • persons 19 years of age and older
  • women who will be pregnant during the influenza season
  • persons who have chronic pulmonary (including asthma), cardiovascular (except hypertension), renal, hepatic, cognitive, neurologic/neuromuscular, hematological or metabolic disorders (including diabetes mellitus)
  • persons who have immunosuppression (including immunosuppression caused by medications or by human immunodeficiency virus
  • residents of nursing homes and other long-term care facilities
  • healthcare personnel
  • household contacts and caregivers of children less than 5 years of age and adults 50 years of age and older, with particular emphasis on vaccinating contacts of children less than 6 months of age;
  • and household contacts and caregivers of persons with medical conditions that put them at higher risk for severe complications from influenza.

 

Who Should Not Be Vaccinated

Talk with your health care provider before getting the injectable influenza vaccine (shot) or IIV if you:

  • Have ever had a severe allergic reaction to eggs or to a previous influenza shot or
  • Have a history of Guillain-Barré syndrome within six weeks following a previous dose of IIV.


If you are sick with a moderate to severe fever when you go to get your influenza vaccine, talk to your doctor or nurse about getting your vaccine at a later date. However, you can get an influenza vaccine at the same time you have a respiratory illness without fever or if you have another mild illness.

The following groups should not be vaccinated with the live nasal spray influenza vaccine or LAIV:

  • adults 50 years of age and older
  • children from 6 through 23 months of age
  • people with a history of hypersensitivity or severe allergic reaction to any of the components of LAIV or to eggs
  • people with asthma and children younger than 5 years with one or more episodes of wheezing within the past year.
  • children or adolescents on long-term aspirin treatment
  • anyone with a weakened immune system
  • severely immunocompromised hospitalized persons who require care in a protected environment or their contacts
  • people with a medical condition that places them at high risk for complications from influenza, including those with chronic heart or lung disease, such as asthma or reactive airways disease
  • people with medical conditions such as diabetes or kidney failure; or people with illnesses that weaken the immune system, or who take medications that can weaken the immune system
  • children or adolescents receiving aspirin
  • people with a history of Guillain-Barré syndrome, a rare disorder of the nervous system
  • pregnant women.


Read the 2014-2015 Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) on the Prevention and Control of Influenza.

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