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Child Care Provider Types


The Utah Department of Health, Child Care Licensing (CCL), regulates and/or monitors both child care centers and home child care providers under Utah Code 26-39. According to Utah statute, child care means continous care and supervision of five or more qualifying children in lieu of parental care, for less than 24 hours a day, and for direct or indirect compendation.


A child care license or certificate is required if a person is caring for more than four children who are not related to the provider, and for more than four hours a day. Individuals and centers who care for less than four unrelated children or for any number of unrelated children for less than four hours a day are welcome to become voluntarily licensed or certified, but a license or certificate is not required. The Department does not regulate providers who only care for related children, or who provide care on a sporadic basis only. A city business license is NOT a Child Care License.


Please click on facility type names below for a short description.

Child Care Licensed Facilities
Licensed Centers
Child care is provided in a non-residential setting and the children have regular schedules of care. The number of children allowed is determined by the facility's total square footage. There must be a director who is at least 21 years old and meets the educational requirements. There must be a safely accessible fenced outdoor play area. Child Care Licensing background screenings are required. Caregiver training is required. There are at least two CCL inspections every year.
Licensed Hourly Centers
Child care is provided in a nonresidential setting and the children do not have regular schedules of care (drop-in care). An outdoor play area is not required. The number of children allowed is determined by the facility's total square footage. There must be a director who is at least 21 years old and meets the educational requirements. CCL background screenings are required. Caregiver training is required. There are at least two CCL inspections every year.
Licensed Out of School Time Programs
Child care is provided in a nonresidential setting and is only for school age (ages 5-12) children. Programs are open to children on an ongoing basis, on three or more days a week, and for 30 or more days in a calendar year. The number of children allowed is determined by the facility's total square footage. There must be a director who is at least 21 years old and meets the educational requirements. CCL background screenings are required. Caregiver training is required. There are at least two CCL inspections every year.
Licensed Family
Child care is provided in a private home for up to 16 children, including the provider's own children under the age of four. Providers must be at least 18 years old. Two qualified caregivers are required when there are more than eight children in care, and when there are more than two children under the age of two in care. With two caregivers, there can be up to (but not more than) four children under the age of two in care. A compliant outdoor play area is required. CCL background screenings are required. Caregiver training is required. There are at least two CCL inspections every year.
Residential Certificate
Child care is provided in a private home for up to eight children, including the provider's own children under the age of four. There can be up to (but not more than) two children under the age of two in care. Providers must be at least 18 years old. An outdoor play area is not required. CCL background screenings are required. Caregiver training is required. There are at least two CCL inspections every year.
License Exempt Child Care Facilities
DWS Approved Family, Friend, and Neighbor (FFN)
Child care is provided in the home of the provider or in the home of the child(ren) and is for children of parents approved for child care subsidy from the Department of Workforce Services (DWS). No more than four unrelated children can be in care, unless they all are siblings. CCL background screenings are required. Caregiver training is required. There are at least two CCL inspections every year.
DWS Approved License Exempt Facilities and Programs
Child care is provided in a nonresidential facility that is not required to be licensed and they receive child care subsidy payments, grants, and/or staff after school professional credentials and development awards from the Department of Workforce Services (DWS). CCL background screenings are required. Caregiver training is required. There are at least two CCL inspections every year.
License Exempt Facilities and Programs
Child care is provided in a facility that is not required to be licensed but is required to register with CCL. They are not eligible to receive any money from the Department of Workforce Services (DWS). CCL background screenings are required. There are no CCL inspections but, when compliants are filed, there are CCL complaint investigations.
Unlicensed Care
There are other types of center and residential child care providers that are not required to be licensed or registered with CCL. If they provide care for less than 5 unrelated qualifying children or for less than 4 hours a day, they are not required to be regulated by CCL. Just remember that even if they have a city business license, NO CCL inspections are conducted and NO CCL background checks are done.
Illegal Care
Some induviduals may be providing care that should be regulated. Even if they have a city business license, NO CCL inspections are conducted and NO CCL background checks are done. Please contact CCL if you want us to verify the validity of a child care provider.

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