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Parents Archive  

Kids SnowshoeingThe Parents Archive contains resources and information that have been removed from the Parents page throughout the school year.

May

  • Summer Activities
  • Screen-Free Week

April

  • Asthma Awareness Month
  • Street, Bike, and Scooter Safety

March

  • National Nutrition Month
  • Snacking
  • Where to Snack

February

  • Family Valentine's Dinner
  • Heart Health and Tobacco

January

  • Dressing for Outdoor Activities
  • Keeping New Year's Resolutions

December

  • Effects of Tobacco
  • Healthy Holiday Recipes

November

  • Healthy Classroom Celebrations
  • We Can!

October

  • Non-Food Rewards at Home
  • Halloween Safety

September

  • Physical Activity Games at Home
  • Building Physical Activity into Your Day
  • Bike and Scooter Safety
  • Street Safety
 

May

Summer Activities
Despite the beautiful weather outdoors it can be easy to stick with your usual indoor screen routine. With a little planning you can fill your summer with fun and active acWhat do we do in the summertime jartivities for the whole family.

Screen-Free Week
Whether consuming “good” or “bad” programming media dominates the lives of too many children leaving little time for other activities that are an integral part of childhood. Are you up for the challenge of turning off screen media April 29-May 5?

Make Screen-Fee Week successful in your home by following these tips

  • Define screen-free for your family. Does it include email and text messaging? Are you still going to video chat with family members in another state or country? Can the computer be used for homework and work?
  • Have activities and outings planned so you are ready on April 29. Give everyone responsibilities and an equal vote.
  • You’ll be more successful if extended family members and friends are involved. Get together at a park, play or­ganized games, or just hang out.
  • Discuss your successes and failures. Decide how you can cut down on screen-time all year long and what you can do to Screen-Free Week even better next year.

 

April

Asthma Awareness Month
Use these resources to help your child with asthma.

  • Open AirwaysOpen Airways is a program run through American Lung Association (ALA) that is designed for children ages 8-11 who have been diagnosed with asthma. Open Airways consists of six 40-minute lessons which help children learn to better manage their asthma. Contact Spencer Slade 801-931-6995 or sslade@lungutah.org  at ALA to schedule Open Airways classes.
  • Dusty the Asthma Goldfish and His Asthma Triggers Funbook
    The Environment Protection Agency has created an activity book to help children and parents learn more about asthma triggers. The activity book has 8 pages and includes a word search, maze, connect the dot puzzle, and coloring pages. The activity book prints easily from a computer and is available for download in both English and Spanish. 
  • Inhaler Technique Videos
    Does your child puff right? These videos will help you learn how to correctly use an inhaler with or without a spacer.

Street, Bike, and Scooter Safety
Chances are the second the temperatures started rising your kids were out the door enjoying the warm weather. Being outdoors poses a few added risks. Keep your kids safe by doing the following

Street Safety

  • Teach them to cross the street at the corner and keep looking while they cross
  • Tell them to never walk or run between parked cars
  • Remind them to always walk on sidewalks or paths. If there is no sidewalk, walk facing traffic as far to the left as possible.
  • Teach your child to never run out into a street for a ball, pet, or for any other reason
  • Make sure your child plays in safe places away from motor vehicles. Good play places include your backyard, parks, and playgrounds.
  • Check on your child frequently when they are outside
  • Before backing out of your driveway or leaving a parking lot look for children
  • Have your child practice safe bike and scooter safety 

Bike and Scooter Safety

  • Wear a helmet
  • Always come to a complete stop at stop signs. Obey all other traffic signs and signals.
  • Before entering the street from your driveway or sidewalk, stop and check for traffic by looking left-right-left
  • Ride on the right side of the street in the same direction as traffic. Remember to ride single file, one behind the other.
  • Riding at night is dangerous. If you must ride at night, make sure to have bright lights in front and back. Wear reflectors and reflective colors to help others see you.
  • Use hand signals to let drivers know what you are going to do

If getting your child to wear a helmet is difficult try some of these tips:

  • Set a good example by wearing your own helmet when you ride bicycles, scooters, and motorcycles
  • Point out famous athletes who use helmets to prevent injuries, examples include football players, baseball players, and even some bull riders
  • Have your child pick out the helmet
  • Never allow your child to ride without wearing a helmet
  • Praise your child for wearing a helmet
  • Start the helmet habit early with your child’s first wheels

March

National Nutrition Month
This year's theme for Nationl Nutrition Month, "Eat Right, Your Way, Every Day" is the perfect opportunity for you to create a healthy eating environment in your home using your family's health needs, culture, and traditions as a guide. Use these resources to celebrate National Nutrition Month in your home.

  • Recipes
    • Creamy Flan
    • Pulled Mexican Pork
    • Ratatouille
  • Tip Sheets
    • Healthy Eating on the Run
    • 25 Healthy Snacks for Kids
    • 20 Ways to enjoy more fruits and vegetables
  • Activities
    • Decode the Secret Message
    • Adult and Kid Sudoku
    • Coloring Pages

Visit eatright.org for even more ideas.

Snacking
Unplanned snacking can lead to weight problems. However, snacking can be helpful in achieving a healthy weight. Most children and teens need to eat every three to four hours. Planning healthy snacks throughout the day will help your kids meet their dietary needs in a healthy way. The best times for snacks are a few hours after a meal and one to two hours before the next meal.

Where to Snack
Designate an eating area and make that the only spot where food can be eaten. This will help you monitor snacking and contain the mess. Don't let your kids eat in front of the tv or while doing other activities. They are more likely to over eat when they are focused on things other than eating.

 

February

Family Valentine's Dinner
Celebrate Valentine's Day with your family by making a delicious dinner. Look through these ideas to get you started

  • Check these websites for healthy Valentine's recipes. Many of them are geared for a dinner for two but put your math skills to the test to double or triple these recipes and make them for the whole family.
  • Create an edible centerpiece by arranging berries on a platter in the shape of a heart.
  • Tell each person at the table something you love about them.
  • Make it special: break out the nice plates, fold your napkins, turn on some music, add candles, serve the meal in courses, the sky's the limit.

Heart Health and Tobacco
Smoking causes coronary heart disease the narrowing of the blood vessels that supply blood and oxygen to the heart. Cigarette smokers are two to four time more likely to develop coronary heart disease than non-smokers and their risk for a stroke is doubled. The narrowing of the arteries reduces the circulation to the heart, affecting the way the heart works and the things you do in your everyday life. Breathing secondhand smoke also has immediate harmful effects on the cardiovascular system that can increase the risk for heart attack.
Smoking harms nearly every organ of the body and causes many diseases and reduces the health of smokers in general. You can help a loved one quit smoking. In fact, smokers are 50 percent more likely to quit and stay tobacco-free if they have the help and support of family and friends. Here are some ideas of things you can do to help someone you know quit:

  • Try giving up something with the smoker such as unhealthy snacks or sugary beverages
  • Help your loved one stay active by going on a daily walk or bike ride
  • Visit or call on a regular basis to listen to their concerns and feelings
  • Go to a smoke-free area or social event instead of the places they normally smoked
  • Put money in a piggy bank each day and save the money they would have spent on tobacco
  • Wash their car and include an interior cleaning to remove smoke odor
  • Celebrate milestones of being smoke-free (i.e. 1 week, 1 month, etc)
  • If they slip-up, assure them it's ok and make a plan for the future
  • Contact the Utah Tobacco Quit Line 1-888-QUIT-NOW

January

Dressing for Outdoor Activities
Exercising through the winter is very important to maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Just remember to dress appropriately for outdoor activities. This is very important to both your health and safety. Here are some tips to help you enjoy your outdoor activities throughout the winter.

  • Layer your clothes. This will give you the opportunity to remove layers as you warm up during your outdoor workout/activities
  • Your shoes should have good traction and fit your feet properly to prevent slipping
  • Wear a hat. You lose most of your heat through your head.
  • Cover your fingers, ears, and nose to prevent frost nip
  • Wear reflective or bright colored clothes so you can be seen. This is especially important during the morning and evening hours.
  • Be aware of your surroundings
  • Drink plenty of water. You can still get dehydrated in the winter.
  • Wear sun screen and sun glasses. The sun rays can bounce off the snow, cement, and water, giving you a sunburn.

Keeping New Year’s Resolutions
A New Year’s resolution is a commitment that you make to change something in the upcoming year. Maybe you are trying to fit in fitness, drop a few pounds, or give up an unhealthy habit. Whatever you choose, here are some tips to help you keep your resolution this year:

  • Be realistic. Don’t pick something that you could never do.
  • Talk about it. Tell others what you plan to do and ask for their support.
  • Set goals. Instead of making a general goal, such as losing weight, try to lose a pound a week for 3 months.
  • Reward yourself. When you reach your goal treat yourself to a book you’ve wanted to read or a night at the movies.
  • Don’t beat yourself up. Take one day at a time. If you slip up one day realize it’s ok and do better the next day.
  • Stick to it. It takes 21 days to create a habit and 6 months for it to become part of your personality.
  • Have fun. Pick a resolution you will have fun doing.

December

Effects of Tobacco
Many young people today have an “invincibility complex,” or the idea that they cannot be hurt by their actions. As a result many are blind to the effects of tobacco that could cause a lifetime of damage to their bodies. Talking to your child is one of the most effective ways to prevent your child from using tobacco. Take time to talk with your child about the harmful effects of tobacco, some of which are listed below:

Healthy Recipes
The holiday season is now if full swing. You may find yourself eating lots of sweets and not as much “healthy food” as you would like. Here are some tips for a healthy holiday

  • Choose white meat over dark meat
  • Skim the fat off turkey drippings before making gravy
  • Eat smaller portions of your favorite foods
  • Instead of heading to the buffet during half time, go play catch organize a game of touch football
  • Make substitutions for butter or oil in some of your favorite recipes.


November

Healthy Classroom Celebrations
There are several times during the year when parents are asked to bring a snack to a school celebration. Typically, foods for these celebrations include candy, cookies, soda, pizza, and cakes. Although there is nothing wrong with an occasional treat these unhealthy food choices have become the norm rather than the exception.

Studies show that students learn their lifelong eating habits at a very young age. By providing your child with treats they are learning that junk food is the way to reward good behavior or celebrate. Mixed signals are sent to student when health and nutrition are taught in the classroom but are not upheld. Try sharing a healthy treat with your child so they learn healthy habits. Here are some ideas:

  • Fresh fruit assortment tray with cheese kabobs
  • Dried fruit or 100% fruit snacks
  • Vegetables with low-fat dip or peanut butter
  • Whole-grain crackers with cheese or hummus
  • Pretzels, low-fat popcorn, or rice cakes
  • Low-fat yogurt, squeezable yogurt, or yogurt parfait
  • Granola bars
  • Whole-grain or low-fat tortilla chips with salsa or bean dip
  • Trail mix
  • Nuts and seeds

Be sure to ask your child's teacher if there are any students with food allergies before serving food in the classroom.


We Can!
We Can LogoWe Can! is a national movement to help parents and caregivers keep their children at a healthy weight. Research shows that parents and caregivers are the primary influence of children. You make a big difference in what your children, and the children you care for, think and do. Eating right and being physically active can help you maintain a healthy weight. When your child sees you making these choices, there's a good chance that they will do the same.

To stay healthy you should eat right and be active. Visit the US Department of Agriculture's website, ChooseMyPlate, and plan and assess your food choices based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. And by getting active, you're using calories you store up from everything you eat over the course of a day. By getting up and moving you are creating an opportunity to connect with your family while improving your health by relieving stress, improving sleep, and making bones and muscles stronger.

October

Non-Food Rewards at Home
Parents can provide non-food rewards at home. Respect and words of appreciation can go a long way. Saying “You did a great job” or “I appreciate your help” is often underestimated as a way to recognize kids for good work or behavior. While sometimes using food as a reward may seem easy, it isn’t the best option for your child’s health. There are many disadvantages of using food as a reward. By rewarding children with food they are learning to eat as a reward, even if they are not hungry and it compromises health.
Here are other ways to reward your child’s good behavior and academic excellence without food

  • Allow your child to have friends over afterschool to play
  • Invite a few friends over for a weekend late nightMom reading to son
  • Let your child plan a special outing
  • Read a bedtime story of your child’s choice
  • Have a family game night, and let your child choose the activity
  • Create a “treasure box” with toys or other items and let your child choose a prize. Here are some ideas for the box:
    • Pencils
    • Jump Ropes
    • Frisbees
    • Stickers
    • Bouncy Balls
    • Sidewalk Chalk
    • Bubbles
  • Date night with a parent
  • Pass to the zoo, aquarium, museum, or school event
  • Let your child have extra play time or privileges
  • Write a note to your child
  • Have your child earn tickets, coupons, or fake money for a family store

Halloween Safety
Spider and WebFor many families, autumn events like Halloween and Harvest Day are fun times to dress up in costumes, go trick-or-treating, attend parties, and eat yummy treats. While your little ghosts and goblins are out having fun you’ll want to make sure they are safe.  Here are some tips to keep you safe this holiday:

  • When carving jack-o-lanterns have children draw the face on the pumpkin and have parents cut it out
  • Remove anything from your porch or yard that a child could trip on
  • Consider purchasing non-food treats for those who visit your home, such as coloring books or pens and pencils
  • Dress children in costumes that are bright and reflective. Consider adding reflective tape to costumes for added visibility.
  • Obtain flashlights or glow sticks for children and their escorts
  • Parents should accompany children and stay in a group
  • Only go to homes with a porch light on and never enter a home or car for a treat
  • Look both ways before crossing the street. Use an established crosswalk whenever possible.
  • Examine all treats when you arrive home. Discard any treats that could be a choking hazard or have been tampered with.
  • Ration treats for the days following Halloween

 

September
Physical Activity Games at Home
The influence of parents is a significant factor in promoting children's participation in physical activity. A parent’s role modeling, support, encouragement, and praise act as a positive influence in promoting physical activity.

Children are active learners and they need to learn to move with skill. While children’s play is often spontaneous and unstructured, children can be taught skills at the same time. Apart from schools, parents and caregivers play a unique role in supporting and guiding children in developing skills. You can help your child learn lifelong habits for good physical fitness by participating in physical activities. Here are some ideas:

  • Be a role model. Participate in and enjoy physical activity yourself.
  • Play active games with your child. Your participation encourages your child to engage in physical activity.
  • Plan time for unstructured play. Young children need blocks of time to invent play, including physical activity.
  • Provide space, including outdoor space, for active play. If your home does not have a place to play outdoors, take your child to a park or schoolyard every day.
  • Look for programs in your community. Your community’s recreation or parks department may have activities for young children. Attend your Parent Teacher Association/Parent Teacher Organization program’s group meeting that provides active play times.
  • Invite a buddy. Your child may be more physically active when he has a playmate.
  • Try planning a variation of a childhood favorite such as hopscotch. See variations here.
  • Play “Busy Body Bingo.” Print out a board for each person that will be playing the game. Ask children to take turns picking out an activity from the board for the family to do. When the movement from that square is complete all participants put a marker on the square (i.e. bean, piece of paper, penny). The first person to get 5 squares in a row is the winner.
  • Limit TV watching. More than an hour or two of TV watching and electronic game playing does pose a threat to your child’s physical well being. Be positive about your child’s activity. Encourage her skills and avoid making fun of her ability.

Building Physical Activity into Your Day
An active lifestyle is healthy and fun for the entire family. Active living means building physical activities into your family’s routine. We all learn by example. If you spend your evening in front of the TV you won’t inspire other family members to be more active. Set an example by making physical activity a priority in your life. Here are some activities to try with your children:

  • Place clear limits on television viewing. Explain your rules in positive concrete terms. Try replacing “You can’t watch TV” with “Let’s turn the TV off so we can…”
  • Take a walk after dinner – and make it a “treasure hunt.” List five to ten items for each of your children to look for on your walk (i.e. a leaf, a twig, pinecones). Provide a paper bag to hold the loot.
  • Ride bikes on a nearby trail
  • Dance to your favorite music in the living room
  • Play Frisbee
  • Have the family go to the local park and play basketball, volleyball, tennis, or soccer.

Bike and Scooter Safety
When it comes to bicycles and scooters, safety starts in the home. Parents must teach their children how to ride safe, which also includes teaching by example. The following is a list of important safety rules to teach your children:

  • Always come to a complete stop at stop signs. Obey all other traffic signs and signals.
  • Before entering the street from your driveway or sidewalk, stop and check for traffic by looking left-right-left
  • Ride on the right side of the street in the same direction as traffic. Remember to ride single file, one behind the other
  • Riding at night is dangerous. If you must ride at night, make sure to have bright lights in front and back. Wear reflectors and reflective colors to help others see you.
  • Use hand signals to let drivers know what you are going to do

If getting your child to wear a helmet is difficult try some of these tips:

  • Set a good example by wearing your own helmet when you ride bicycles, scooters, and motorcycles
  • Point out famous athletes who use helmets to prevent injuries, examples include football players, baseball players, and even some bull riders
  • Have your child pick out the helmet
  • Never allow your child to ride without wearing a helmet
  • Praise your child for wearing a helmet
  • Start the helmet habit early with your child’s first wheels

Street Safety
Spring is here and your kids are ready to go outside and play. Kids’ smaller size makes them difficult for drivers to see. Parents and legal guardians should explain why safety is important. Here are some tips for keeping your child safe:

  • Have your child practice safe bike and scooter safety
  • Teach them to cross the street at the corner and keep looking while they cross
  • Tell them to never walk or run between parked cars
  • Remind them to always walk on sidewalks or paths. If there is no sidewalk, walk facing traffic as far to the left as possible.
  • Teach your child to never run out into a street for a ball, pet, or any other reason
  • Make sure your child plays in safe places away from motor vehicles. Good play places include your backyard, parks, and playgrounds.
  • Check on your child frequently when they are outside
  • Before backing out of your driveway or leaving a parking lot look for children
 
 
   
   
   

 

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