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EMT & Paramedic Certification


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Initial Certification, Recertification, and Reciprocity

The following links provide step-by-step instructions for receiving or renewing EMS certification in Utah.

  • Initial Certification: For individuals applying to become certified EMS professionals for the first time, or becoming certified again after their previous certification that expired more than one year ago.
  • Recertification: For currently certified EMS professionals, or individuals with a previous certification that expired less than one year ago, applying to renew their certification.
  • Reciprocity Certification: For EMS professionals certified elsewhere (another state, the armed forces, etc.) applying to become certified at the equivalent level by the State of Utah.

Additional Certification Resources


EMS Certifications Available in Utah

The following EMS certifications are available in Utah:

  • Emergency Medical Responder: An EMR performs basic lifesaving and first aid. An EMR is not employed by an EMS agency, but is trained in communicating with EMTs and Paramedics.
  • Emergency Medical Technician: The primary focus of the Emergency Medical Technician is to provide basic emergency medical care and transportation for critical and emergent patients, and to provide care to minimize secondary injury and provide comfort to the patient while transporting the patient to an emergency care facility. This is a competency-based course, but courses must include at least 120 hours of training.
  • Emergency Medical Technician—Basic (EMT-B): EMT-B was the entry level EMS certification in Utah prior to 2012. Between 2012 and 2016, it is being replaced by EMT. An EMT-B handles emergencies utilizing Basic Life Support equipment and skills in accordance with all behavioral objectives in the Department of Transportation, National Standard Curricula, Emergency Medical Technician—Basic 1994. It is equivalent to EMT.
  • Advanced Emergency Medical Technician (AEMT): The primary focus of the Advanced Emergency Medical Technician is to provide basic and limited advanced emergency medical care and transportation for critical and emergent patients who access the emergency medical system. Advanced Emergency Medical Technicians perform interventions with the basic and advanced equipment typically found on an ambulance. This level replaces EMT-Intermediate. This is a competency-based course.
  • Emergency Medical Technician—Intermediate (EMT-I): Between 2011 and 2013, EMT-I is being replaced by AEMT. An EMT-I handles emergencies utilizing Basic and Advanced Life Support equipment and skills in accordance with all behavioral objectives in the Department of Transportation, National Standard Curricula (NSC), Emergency Medical Technician—Basic 1994 and EMT-I 1998 NSC Utah subset.
  • Emergency Medical Technician—Intermediate Advanced (EMT-IA): An EMT-IA handles emergencies utilizing Basic and Advanced Life Support equipment and skills in accordance with all behavioral objectives in the Department of Transportation, National Standard Curricula (NSC), Emergency Medical Technician—Basic 1994 and EMT-I 1998 NSC. An EMT-I can perform all EMT-B skills and equipment usage, plus key advanced-care skills including additional patient assessment skills, advanced airway adjuncts, intravenous therapy, defibrillation, use of medications, and interpretation of basic cardiac dysrhythmias. The EMT-IA course requires completion of a clinical tracking form and demonstation of competency in all psychomotor objectives; the course typically takes 400–600 hours of training to complete. Utah has only a small handful of EMS agengies that operate at the EMT-IA level, but an EMT-IA may work for a lower level agency.
  • Paramedic: Paramedic is the highest level EMS certification in Utah. A Paramedic handles emergencies utilizing all Basic and Advanced Life Support equipment and skills in accordance with all behavioral objectives in the Department of Transportation, National Standard Curricula (NSC), Emergency Medical Technician—Basic 1994 and Paramedic 1998 NSC. A Paramedic can perform all EMT-B skills and equipment usage, plus Advanced Life Support using intravenous therapy, medications, defibrillator and advanced airway adjuncts to control the airway in cases of respiratory or cardiac arrest. The Paramedic course requires at least 610 hours of training and 596 hours of clinical and field experience.
  • Emergency Medical Dispatcher (EMD): An EMD handles 911 emergency calls for medical response. An EMD obtains information from callers, allocates EMS resources, and provides emergency care instructions to callers. An EMD is familiar with basic emergency medical concepts. EMD training involves 24 hours of classroom training or completion of an NAEMD-approved course.
  • Medical Director: A Medical Director is a licensed physician, usually with a specialization in emergency care, who provides offline medical direction to one or more EMS agencies. A Medical Director develops and evaluates protocols, oversees training, and ensures that an EMS agency's medical care is compliant with state regulations.
  • EMS Instructor, Dispatch Instructor, Course Coordinator, and Training Officer: Personnel who provide, coordinate, or oversee training of EMTs, Paramedics, and EMDs must be certified to do so. Instructors and Course Coordinators conduct training courses. Training Officers coordinate the ongoing continuing education of the personnel in their EMS agencies. See Training for more information.

The EMS for Children program provides an EMS Provider Quick Reference Guide, which provides further information about the medications and skills used by the EMT-B, EMT-I, EMT-IA, and Paramedic.

To find out how many people are currently certified at each certification level, see Certified EMS Personnel.


New EMS Certification Levels

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NTHSA) has developed new 2009 National EMS Education Standards. The Education Standards list four levels of certification that the State of Utah is adopting:

  • Emergency Medical Responder (EMR): New certification level, January 2009
  • Emergency Medical Technician (EMT): Replaces EMT-Basic, January 2012
  • Advanced Emergency Medical Technician (A-EMT): Replaces EMT-Intermediate, October 2011
  • Paramedic: Updates existing Paramedic, January 2013

More information about the new certification levels...

Questions? Contact the Bureau of EMS at ems@utah.gov or 801-273-6666.

Updated February 11, 2014