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Key Findings

 

How did Utah quality of care compare with the nation in 2006?


Patient Safety Indicators

Utah overall (as a state) had lower rates than expected on three patient safety indicators, compared to similar mothers and newborns in the U.S.  Measures and rates are in parentheses.  Specifically, Utah overall had lower than expected rates for

Most Utah hospitals (28 out of 37) at which 30 or more babies were born had fewer than expected for injuries to the newborn in 2004 through 2006. That is, each of these hospitals had fewer of these injuries than similar babies in the U.S., adjusted for the baby’s sex.  Nine hospitals did about as expected, that is, about the same as similar hospitals that treated similar mothers and newborns.

The definition of this indicator changed in late 2003. Prior to October 2003, “head molding” might have been included in the indicator. “Newborn head molding” is an abnormal head shape that occurs from pressure on the baby’s head during delivery. This is not a serious condition and the baby’s head often returns to its normal shape in a few days.  The change in definition resulted in a decrease in reported injuries to newborns starting in 2004.

Over one third of Utah hospitals (9 out of 24) at which 30 or more babies were born had fewer than expected injuries to the mother during a delivery with instruments in 2006.  That is, each of these hospitals had fewer of these injuries than similar mothers in the U.S., adjusted for the mother’s age and comorbidities (other conditions affecting her pregnancy and delivery).  One hospital had more of these injuries than expected.  The remaining 14 hospitals did about the same as expected.

Nearly half of Utah hospitals (17 out of 37) at which 30 or more babies were born had fewer than expected injuries to the mother during a delivery without instruments in 2006. That is, each of these hospitals had fewer of these injuries than similar mothers in the U.S., adjusted for the mother’s age and comorbidities (other conditions affecting her pregnancy and delivery). One hospital had more of these injuries than expected. The 19 remaining hospitals did about the same as expected.

Note: Many factors can affect in-hospital injuries at a particular hospital.  Read more in About the Report.

Utilization Indicators

Note: Many factors can affect in-hospital procedures at a particular hospital, such as the health of the mother and baby, or the availability of hospital specialists and facilities.  Currently, the health care community does not have an agreed-upon benchmark for the optional rates for first-time Cesarean and VBAC deliveries. 

How did hospital charges differ among Utah hospitals in 2006?

Average hospital charges for the maternity and newborn cases in this report differed widely. For those at the minor/moderate illness level, average hospital charges ranged from:

As expected, average hospital charges for maternity and newborn cases where the severity was considered major/extreme were higher than cases where the severity level was considered minor/moderate 

Note: Many factors will affect hospital charges. Read more in About the Report.

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Last updated: November 13, 2008 1:37 PM